VOCABULARY - IDIOMS


Idiomatic Expressions - List in Alphabetical Order


idioms

List of idioms in alphabetical order

A list of idioms arranged in alphabetical order (with definitions and examples.) For a list arranged in categories, click here


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Learn English Idioms

A list of English idioms with definitions and examples:

jack-of-all-trades
said about someone who is able to do many things.

He can do many jobs; he's really a jack-of-all-trades

Category | names

jam on the brakes
to press the brakes suddenly and in a hard way.

I had to jam on the brakes because a kid suddenly appeared from nowhere and crossed the road.

Category | general

jangle someones's nerves
to annoy someone or or make them nervous.

The noise of the kids jangled my nerves.

Category | men and women

Jekyll and Hyde
Jekyll and Hyde refers to someone having a dual personality, one side of which is good and the other evil.

The origin of the phrase comes from Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886).

She's a real Jekyll and Hyde. You never know when she will become unpleasant.

Category | names

Joe Bloggs
an average typical man.

This car is very expensive and is not the sort of thing that Joe Bloggs would buy.

Category | names

John Hancock
a person's signature.

Put your John Hancock at the bottom of the page.

Category | names

join the club
said as a reply to someone to mean that they are in the same situation.

Nancy: "I've got problems with my husband these days."
Alice: "Join the club!"


Category | relationship

jump on the bandwagon
To profit from a craze; to join a trend.

After the incredible success of the new product, the company has jumped on the bandwagon, and released a new version of it.

Category | travel

jump the gun
The phrase jump the gun means to act too soon, before the right time.

They jumped the gun and decided to get married before really knowing each other.

Category | war

jump the lights
To pass a set of traffic lights when they are not showing green.

It's dangerous to jump the lights. You may have a terrible accident.

Category | travel

just what the doctor ordered
The idiom just what the doctor ordered means exactly what is required or wanted.

Alan: Orange juice?
Greg: Thanks! Orange juice is just what the doctor ordered.


Category | health

Justice is blind
Justice is blindThis expression means that justice is impartial and objective. There is an allusion here to the Greek statue for justice, wearing a blindfold so as not to treat friends differently from strangers, or rich people better than the poor ones.

No matter who you are, you must respect the law. Justice is blind!

Category | law

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