VOCABULARY - IDIOMS


Idiomatic Expressions - List in Alphabetical Order


idioms

List of idioms in alphabetical order

A list of idioms arranged in alphabetical order (with definitions and examples.) For a list arranged in categories, click here


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Learn English Idioms

A list of English idioms with definitions and examples:

easy come, easy go
said about something which is easily won or obtained and then soon spent or lost.

He lost a large amount of money in poker. But that's gambling; easy come, easy go.

Category | general

easy on the ear
something (music, voice...) pleasant to listen to.

His music is easy on the ear.

Category | parts of the body

easy on the eye
attractive, pleasant to look at.

Her paintings are easy on the eye.

Category | parts of the body

eat humble pie
(also eat humble crow) said when you admit that you were wrong.

In the begining he boasted that she would get the best grade. But then she was forced to eat humble pie.

Category | food

eat like a horse
The phrase the eat like a horse is an idiomatic expression that means to eat large amounts of food.

John: Have you noticed how fat he has become?

Leila: No wonder he eats like a horse.


Category | animals

eat one's words
If someone has to eat their words, this means that they have to admit that they were not right about something they said earlier.

Eat one's words synonyms


Other words and phrases that have the same meaning include:

eat crow;
retract;
regret;
recant.


Her classmates considered her a stupid girl, but when she got the top mark in mathematics, she made them eat their words.

He said I wouldn't be able to pass the exam, but I proved him wrong and made him eat his words.

Whether you like it or not, our team has won. So now you have to eat your words.

The journalist had a negative prediction about the company, but after he saw how the new manager's strategy boosted the production he ate his words.

I had a low opinion of the team, but I certainly ate my words when they started to win every match they played.


Category | language

eat your heart out
The phrase eat your heart out is meant as a joke that you are even better than another person (often a celebrity).

I am singing in the school party next week - Madonna, eat your heart out!

Category | parts of the body

every cloud has a silver lining
This expression is used to say that there is always something good even in an unpleasant, difficult or even painful situation.

The origin of this expression is most likely traced to John Milton's "Comus" (1634) with the lines,

Was I deceiv'd, or did a sable cloud
Turn forth her silver lining on the night?

You should never feel hopeless. Every cloud has a silver lining, you know

Category | weather

every dog has its day
everyone has a time of success and satisfaction.

You may become successful in your business someday. Every dog has his day.

Category | animals

every man has his price
The phrase every man has his price means that everyone can be bribed if you know how much or what to bribe him or her with.

"I offered him ten thousand dollars to sign the agreement, but he refused."
"Just keep trying! Give him more. You know, every man has his price!"


Category | men and women

every man jack
The phrase every man jack means every person without exception.

All the volunteers contributed their time towards cleaning up the city, every man jack of them.

Category | men and women

every minute
describing the whole period that something lasted.

I enjoyed every minute of the match. It was just fantastic.

Category | time

every Tom, Dick and Harry
said about something that is common knowledge to everybody.

Every Tom, Dick and Harry knows what happened.

Category | names

every trick in the book
said when you try every possible way to achieve something.

She's tried every trick in the book to convince him in vain.

Category | general

everybody and his cousin
everybody; a huge crowd; too many people


Everybody and his cousin will be in line for opening night with free popcorn!


Category | relationship

everything but the kitchen sink
Almost everything, whether needed or not.

She must have brought everything but the kitchen sink along on the trip, and how she lifted her suitcase, I do not know.

Category | home

expectant mother
a pregnant woman.

There are many good tips for expectant mothers in this little book.

Category | relationship

experience is the mother of wisdom
this idiom is used to mean that people learn from what happens to them.

You will never understand the love parents have for their children until you get your own children. Experience is really the mother of wisdom.

Category | relationship

eye candy
A very attractive person or persons or any object or sight with considerable visual appeal.

1. I'm going to the beach to check out some eye candy.
2. The computer graphics added lots of eye candy to that movie.


Category | food

eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth
The phrase eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth refers to a principle found in Babylonian Law, in the Code of Hammurabi, as well as in monotheist religions - Judaism, Christianity and Islam. According to this principle a person who has injured another person is penalized to a similar degree.

If he killed the poor woman, he deserves to die. It's as simple as that - an eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth.

Category | religion

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