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Present Perfect | Already, Since, For, Yet, Just


Already, Since, For, Yet, Just

Already, since, For, Yet, Just

The words "already, since, for, yet, just" are often used with the present perfect. Below, we will see what they mean and how they are used with the present perfect.

The form of the present perfect tense

Let's first review the form of the present perfect tense:

The auxiliary 'have' (in the simple present form) + Verb (in the past participle form)

The different forms of the present perfect:

Positive Negative Interrogative
I have done... I have not done... Have you done...?

Examples:

  • Have you written the report yet?
  • No, I haven't written the report yet.
  • Yes, I have already written the report.
  • She has just written the report.
  • I have known her for a long time.
  • I have known her since 2007.

Already, Since, For, Yet, Just

Already

'Already' is an adverb used to show that something has happened early, or earlier han expected.

  • She has already sent an email to the manager.

Position of already

'Already' comes between 'have'/'has' and the past participle (i.e. the mid position).

Note that:

Sometimes 'already' may come at the end of the sentence for greater emphasis or to show greater surprise. This is especially common in informal speaking:

  • They've spent nearly a lot of money on it already.

It may also come in the front position:

  • Already, the supporters of the newly elected president have occupied the streets to celebrate the event.

Since

You can use 'since' when you are mentioning a time or event in the past and indicating that a situation has continued from then until now.

  • I haven't seen Lacy since 2014

Position

'Since' is used before a time when something began.

For

'For' is used to say how long something has lasted.

  • I haven't seen him for two years.

Position

'For' is used before a period of time: for two years, for a long time, for a week...

Yet

'Yet' is used in negative sentences to show that something has not happened up to the present time. It is also used in interrogative forms to ask if something has happened up to the present time.

  • I haven't finished yet.
  • Have you finished yet?

Position

Yet’ usually comes at the end of the sentence.

Just

'Just' is used to indicate that something happened in the immediate past, that is a very short time ago.

  • He has just called.

'Just' comes between 'have'/ 'has' and the past participle (i.e. the mid position).

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